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The future of office ergonomics: Standardize or optimize?

The future of office ergonomics: Standardize or optimize?

We have all heard of the many workplace approaches espoused by leaders in occupational health. But what does the near future hold for office-based workers? The Texas A&M; Ergonomics Center is researching new methods to evaluate and intervene in office worker behaviors to impact health and improve productivity andlongevity.
By Mark Benden

Blending technology with people in the ergonomics of tomorrow

Blending technology with people in the ergonomics of tomorrow

With industrial and societal changes well underway with Industry 4.0, we are primed for changes that will alter the work and cultural scene, impact human/system interactions and change the way we approach ergonomics. What do ergonomics practitioners, teachers, students, leaders and other influencers need tobe prepared for in 2020 and beyond?
By Bobbie Watts

Blending technology with people in the ergonomics of tomorrow

What the future may hold for US federal ergonomics regulations

A “one-size-fits-all” ergonomics standard was intended to revolutionize the way work is done in the U.S., the handling of work-related soft tissue illnesses and injuries in the workplace and how these injuries were to be treated by the worker’scompensation system. Regulation efforts since have shown that a focus on occupational-specific standards are a more effective approach.
By Timothy (Tim) Pottorff

Blending technology with people in the ergonomics of tomorrow

Are your work cells too big? Why smaller is usually better

Many manufacturing work cells are simply too big – they occupy too much space. Some work cells attempt too many operations on too many products, often with toomany people. In addition, there are more subtle and behavioral effects of excess space, which discourages visual control, communication, teamwork and problem-solving.
By Quarterman Lee

Innovative solutions to overcome educational lab limitations

Innovative solutions to overcome educational lab limitations

Some teaching universities and institutions face budget cuts and reduced enrollment, making it a challenge to fund their educational labs and offer enough opportunities for students to get involved in research projects. This article describes how a low-budget but funded project was used to benefit the industrial hygiene lab at Indiana State University.
By Farman A. Moayed