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Lean is a people-centric system 

Lean is a people-centric system

The challenge of lean thinking is to seek sustainable superior performance by creating an improvement dynamic in the business from focusing on success for customers and employees alike, increasing mindfulness about work to reduce the unavoidable mistakes created by routine, and support new insights and initiatives from employees to more deeply engage them in their work and involve them with their teams and, more widely, with the company.
By Daniel Jones and Michael Ballé 

Hit and miss ergonomics education 

Hit and miss ergonomics education

There is a disconnect between the curriculum of ABET-accredited ISE programs and the roles depicted by the IISE Industry Advisory Board. As the working age population in the United States grows older and with ISEs taking the lead on many workplace-related initiatives to improve efficiency, it is more important than ever to incorporate ergonomics/human factors into all aspects of each process, especially the design phase.
By James Rethaber 

ISO? Lean? Why not both? 

ISO? Lean? Why not both?

Your company might follow a thorough quality system, processes that produce a good quality product. In these cases, some might question whether you need ISO certification. Well, the ISO certification is a badge that lets current and potential customers know you have a documented process that has controls for quality, along with accountability for process improvement. This allows customers to be reassured that they will receive products that meet their requirements.
By Joe Perillo 

The triple bottom line 

The triple bottom line

Efficient handling and storing of materials is vital to industry. In addition to raw materials, these operations provide a continuous flow of parts and assemblies through the workplace and ensure that materials are available when needed. Unfortunately, the improper handling and storing of materials often results in costly injuries.
By Jim Rock 

Raj Sanne 

Facility layout payout

As an organization grows, its personnel might stick new machines and storage wherever they can find space without paying attention to how the placement affects operations. Material handling, storage and how lengthy travel distances affect the material in question are all parts of a moving equation that determines optimal layout. In today's competitive environment where customers determine price, it is necessary to focus and minimize non-value-adding activity as much as possible.
By Raj Sanne 


 
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