Industrial Engineer Engineering and Management Solutions at Work

September 2010    |    Volume: 42    |    Number: 9

The member magazine of the Institute of Industrial and Engineers

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Better together

Better together 

Collaborative efforts between academia and industry can create training opportunities for students and profitable research and development opportunities for companies. Academics should take the lead to forge that relationship and give the industrial engineering discipline more exposure as a facilitating tool.
By Dima Nazzal and Cyrus Hillsman

Process patent pending

Process patent pending 

IEs often design, implement, manage and improve processes and methods, but the best way to protect a business' intellectual property is not clear-cut. In June, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Bilski et al. v. Kappos, which explored what constitutes a patent-eligible process under the Patent Act. This article explains the verdict and what it may mean for businesses. 
By Basil M. Angelo

Beating turbulence 

Beating turbulence 

Due to the economic turmoil since late 2008, rethinking growth strategy is is a worthwhile endeavor because the rules of engagement have changed. This article presents some of the best growth transition planning practices to meet the rigors of the new marketplace. The practices focus on how to avoid a common roadblock to success: failure to align all stakeholders.
By Sonny Williams and Kenneth H. Marks

A new purchasing philosophy 

A new purchasing philosophy 

Preparing a purchasing organization to implement a lean enterprise system takes a philosophical change in thought process -- going from a traditional supplier-customer relationship to a mutually beneficial partnership mentality while understanding true cost and information flow between the new partner and customer. 
By Chris Harris and Chuck Streeter

The language of cost 

The language of cost 

Mechanical computer-aided design (MCAD) and product lifecycle management (PLM) providers long to be accepted outside of engineering departments while ERP vendors strive to enter the engineering and product delivery arena. The only way to translate the language of engineering into the language of business is "cost," specifically, product cost. 
By Thomas R. Cutler



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